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Sunday, 9 October 2016

ANGLE BEAM IN ULTRASONIC INSPECTION.

Angle Beam 1:- Angle Beam Transducers and wedges are typically used to introduce a refrected shear wave into the test material. An angled sound path allows, the sound beam come in from the side,thereby improving detectability of flaws in and around welded areas.
Angle Beam 2:- Angle beam transducers and wedges are typically used to introduce a refrected shear wave into the test material. The geometry of the sample below allows the sound beam to be reflected from the back wall to improve detectability of flaws in and around welded areas.

C-SCAN DATA IN ULTRASONIC INSPECTION.

The C-scan presentations provides a plan-type view of the location and size of test specimen features. The plane of the image is parallel to the scan pattern of the transducer. C-scan presentations are produced with an automated data acquisition system, such as a computer controlled immersion scanning system. Typically, a data collection gate is established on the A-scan and the amplitude or the time -of-flight of the signal is recorded at regular intervals as the transducer is scanned over the test piece. The relative signal amplitude or the time -of-flight is displayed as a shade of Gray or a color for each of the positions where data was connected. The C-scan presentations provides an image of the features that reflect and scatter the sound within and on the surfaces of the test piece.
High resolution scans can produce very detailed images. Both images were produced using a pulse-echo technique with the transducer scanned over the head side in an immersion scanning system. For the C-scan image on the left, the gate was setup to capture the amplitude of the sound reflecting from the front surface of the quarter. Light areas in the image indicate areas that reflected a greater amount of energy back to the transducer. In the C-scan image on the right, the gate was moved to record the intensity of the sound reflecting from the back surface of the coin. The details on the back surface are clearly visible but front surface features are also still visible since the sound energy is affected by these features as it travels through the front surface of the coin.